Daily Hits

I have a question regarding Daily Hits and it’s associated limit.
My website statistics are as follows:

Total storage approx 245Mb

68 HTML files
4 CSS files
1099 image files located in 44 sub-folders
So roughly, 1171 files in total.

All the HTML files are simple, straightforward types with just text and images.
Each HTML file accesses just 2 of the above CSS files.
Some pages only access 4 or 5 image files whereas one or two might contain up to 50.

Q1. If someone visits my site and accesses every single page, and by default, their associated images, does that result in 1171 hits?

Q2. If someone reads a specific page, and later the same day, reads the same page again, does this still increase the hit counter even though the files may still be cached?

If the answer to Q1 is indeed, 1171, then it would only take approx 42 visitors, reading every single page, to exceed the 50000 daily hit limit?

Is my interpretation of how the hit system works correct?

Regards,

1 Like

If one person visits all pages and loads all content without any caching, the total hits would be the sum of all requested files.

If a user reads a specific page and the associated files (like images and CSS) are cached, then revisiting the same page later in the day typically wouldn’t increase the hit counter for those cached items. Browsers use caching to reduce load times and bandwidth by storing copies of files locally.

Yes, you’re right, but in practice, hardly anyone will sit down and look through a thousand pictures at once
and it’s up to you to use lazy load and download images only when there is a need for it
and not immediately pull 100 and display them on the web page, instead the user has to scroll down and then display images that have not yet been displayed.

8 Likes

Wow. Really appreciate the insight.

I’ve checked out the img src loading=“lazy” attribute, of which I was completely unaware of.
Never too old to learn!

From what I’ve read, I’ll add it to all the img statements except for the first couple of images that may be visible when the page loads.

Many thanks for the help.

2 Likes

You’re welcome,
once you have your domain instead of a free subdomain
then you can use Cloudflare and be much calmer as far as hits are concerned.

Good luck

3 Likes

Consider using image sprites to consolidate small images like icon and spacers etc. This can reduce your hit counts.

2 Likes

Not sure what you mean - image sprites.

The site is basically an illustrated book. It’s important as the reader scrolls down, the images appear without having to click a thumbnail or such. That would spoil the presentation.

The 1099 image files are shared by 65 HTML files (excluding the 3 index files which have no images or icons) so the average page would access 17 images. Obviously, some pages only have a few images, whereas the largest has approx 50.

There are no icons at all except for the intro page which has 2.

1 Like

It’s OK if you don’t understand image sprites — it way more complex than just adding lazy load code onto every image.

Since you don’t actually load 1,000 images at once, there’s not so much need for this complex method.

4 Likes

Just did some research about it on W3 schools.

I definitely think I’ll pass on the subject. :smiley:

About to start 1000 loadin=“lazy” edits. :sweat:

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed 7 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.